50th Anniversary of School Closures

This year marks the 50th Anniversary of the mass closure of the African American high schools in Louisiana. Prior to 1970 there were approximately one hundred eighty-five high schools throughout the state and their classification ranged from single A to triple AAA. Their affiliations extended through the various religious denominations in the beginning to the publicly funded schools near the termination of the era of the African American high school. All has not been lost since 1970. Approximately fifteen historically African American High Schools presently exist.

This year marks the third anniversary of AfricanAmericanHighSchoolsinLouisianaBefore1970.com.  This website expanded from an idea to preserve the history of the LIALO to exceeding 30,000 pages of information that would otherwise be found at our local waste disposal sites. We are preserving this information which includes a wide array of sources and types: histories of school’s origin, mascots, alma maters, historical markers, coaches, yearbooks, class histories, newspaper articles, state department records, class roles for entire schools and published books.

A noteworthy effort, History of Central Colored High School, 1917 to 1949, the ten-year effort of Mrs. Gwendolyn Deloris Swinton, was placed on the site under the Central Colored High School banner. The book is a collection of information of this institution that paved the way for African American students in much of Caddo Parish and northwestern Louisiana corridor for thirty years. The time of its existence was short-lived, however, the Phoenix, Booker T. Washington High School rose from the ashes. The old Central Colored High School building stands today as a testament to its legacy. Mrs. Swinton’s book documents how education for the African American high school student was meant to be. There was a dedicated and well-educated faculty and a hungry community striving to succeed in life. The graduates subsequently dispersed throughout the world proud to be from the school and became aspirational leaders in the world community. The youngest graduates are now older than eighty-eight years old and only a few are alive today. We must not forget their experiences and their contributions to our existence. Interestingly, after another twenty years the youngest graduates of an African American high school from the era before 1970 will be eighty-eight years old. There will be few of us alive at this time in the future and we, too, desire to be remembered.


2 thoughts on “50th Anniversary of School Closures

  1. Living your life is a task so difficult, it has never been attempted before. Be like a tree, let the dead leaves drop as some of life’s best lessons were learned at the worst times. You exemplifies “Many of us are more capable than some of us” and I am proud of the contributions you have made toward depictions of the African American histories.  Thank-you for the labor of love. Hilda Grimes, (Retired) Licensed S/L Pathologist & Audiologisthilgrimes@cs.com 318-335-9898 Home 318-359-8818 Mobile

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  2. This is the best report for maintaining the history of African American schools.You and your team have done a wonderful production. Very interesting reading.

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